ACT english practice test 9

DIRECTIONS: In the passages that follow, certain words and phrases are underlined and numbered. In the right-hand column, you will find alternatives for the underlined part. In most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is best, choose “NO CHANGE.” In some cases, you will find in the right-hand column a question about the underlined part. You are to choose the best answer to the question.

You will also find questions about a section of the passage, or about the passage as a whole. These questions do not refer to an underlined portion of the passage, but rather are identified by a number or numbers in a box.

For each question, choose the alternative you consider best and fill in the corresponding oval on your answer document. Read each passage through once before you begin to answer the questions that accompany it. For many of the questions, you must read several sentences beyond the question to determine the answer. Be sure that you have read far enough ahead each time you choose an alternative.


Visiting Mackinac Island

Visiting Mackinac (pronounced "Mackinaw") Island is like taking a step back to the past46 in time. Victorian houses'47 and a fort dating back to the War of 1812 surround the historic downtown, where horses and buggies still pull passengers down the road.

The only way to get to48 Mackinac Island is by boat or private plane, and you may not bring your car. Automobiles are outlawed on the little, isolated, Michigan, island,49 so visitors can see the sights only by horse, carriage, or by riding a bicycle,49 or on foot. Luckily, the island is small enough that cars are not necessary, Mackinac51 measures only a mile and a half in diameter.

There are many things to see while visiting Mackinac Island. The majestic Grand Hotel is a popular tourist spot, as are the governor's mansion and Arch Rock, a towering limestone arch formed naturally by water erosion. Fort Mackinac, where they still set off cannons every hour, is also a popular place to visit. Visible from parts of the island are Mackinac Bridge-the longest suspension bridge ever built-and a picturesque old lighthouse.

Shopping is also a favorite pastime on Mackinac Island. The island's biggest industry is tourism, For the island's many tourists, the most popular item of sale54 on Mackinac Island is fudge. The downtown streets are lined with fudge shops, where55 tourists can watch fudge of all different flavors being made before lining up to buy some for themselves. These fudge shops are so numerous and abundant56 that the local residents have even developed a special nickname for these tourists: I call57 the tourists "fudgies."

Apart from sightseeing and shopping, Mackinac Island is a great place to just sit back and relax. In the summer, a gentle lake breeze floats through the air, when it creates58 a beautiful, temperate climate. It is peaceful to sit in the city park and watch the ferries and private boats float into the harbor. The privacy of the island's environs certainly don't give59 it the hustle-bustle quality of a city, but the relaxing atmosphere makes Mackinac Island the perfect place to visit to get away from the hectic pace of everyday life.

46.

F. NO CHANGE
G. moving in a past-related direction
H. going back to the past, not the future,
J. stepping back

47.

A. NO CHANGE
B. house's
C. houses
D. houses,

48.

F. NO CHANGE
G. your sweet self over to
H. yourself on down to
J. over to

49.

A. NO CHANGE
B. isolated Michigan island
C. isolated Michigan island,
D. isolated, Michigan, island

50.

F. NO CHANGE
G. by bicycle,
H. riding on a bicycle,
J. bicycle,

51.

A. NO CHANGE
B. necessary, furthermore, Mackinac
C. necessary. Mackinac
D. necessary Mackinac

52. If the writer were to delete the phrase "formed naturally by water erosion" (placing a period after the word arch), this sentence would primarily lose:

F. a detail describing the unique formation of the Arch Rock.
G. factual information concerning the geological formations of the tourist attractions on Mackinac Island.
H. a contrast to the governor's mansion, which was constructed by human hands.
J. nothing; this information is detailed elsewhere in this paragraph.

53. Given that all the following are true, which one, if added here at the end of this sentence, would provide the most effective transition to the topic discussed in the sentence that follows?

A. so there are many souvenir stores, T-shirt shops, and candy and ice cream parlors.
B. so Mackinac Island has not been negatively affected by outsourcing.
C. which is a big change from the island's eighteenth-century use in the fur trade.
D. but it's not a tourist attraction like many others with theme parks and chain restaurants.

54.

F. NO CHANGE
G. for selling
H. for sale
J. of selling

55. Which of the following alternatives to the underlined portion would NOT be acceptable?

A. which
B. so
C. and
D. in which

56.

F. NO CHANGE
G. abundantly numerous
H. numerous
J. of an abundance truly numerous

57.

A. NO CHANGE
B. one calls
C. it calls
D. they call

58.

F. NO CHANGE
G. creating
H. once it creates
J. as if it had created

59.

A. NO CHANGE
B. isn't giving
C. hasn't given
D. doesn't give

60. This question asks about the preceding passage as a whole.

Suppose the writer had intended to write an essay on the difficulty the residents of Mackinac Island have had prohibiting automobile traffic from the historic island. Would this essay have successfully fulfilled that goal?

F. Yes, because the automobile has become such an essential part of American tourist travel that the residents are clearly threatened.
G. Yes, because this essay discusses the fact that automobiles are outlawed and goes on to detail many of the reasons this was possible.
H. No, because the essay focuses instead on other aspects of Mackinac Island, mentioning automobiles in only one part of the passage.
J. No, because this essay describes the ways the residents of Mackinac Island have sought to bring automobiles back to the island, not to outlaw them.