ACT english practice test 53

DIRECTIONS: In the passages that follow, certain words and phrases are underlined and numbered. In the right-hand column, you will find alternatives for the underlined part. In most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is best, choose “NO CHANGE.” In some cases, you will find in the right-hand column a question about the underlined part. You are to choose the best answer to the question.

You will also find questions about a section of the passage, or about the passage as a whole. These questions do not refer to an underlined portion of the passage, but rather are identified by a number or numbers in a box.

For each question, choose the alternative you consider best and fill in the corresponding oval on your answer document. Read each passage through once before you begin to answer the questions that accompany it. For many of the questions, you must read several sentences beyond the question to determine the answer. Be sure that you have read far enough ahead each time you choose an alternative.


A Never-Ending Battle

Not many people know it, but the character was originally a villain. Intending it as an allegory for the

growing Nazi menace in Europe, in 1933 image fans—Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster—concocted a story for a pulp magazine about an evil figure with strange mind-control

image on world domination. No one took much notice.

As the political situation in Europe and the Great Depression in America both worsened, and after Siegel’s father died during a robbery of his New York City clothing image two boys became disenchanted with writing about a villain. They decided that what the world needed were uplifting stories about a hero who used his

abilities to protect image downtrodden and

defenseless, rather than image them.

imageimage and attributes but retaining the original name: Superman.

An instant success from his first appearance in 1938,

image Superman gave rise to the concept of the superhero, which quickly became the dominant genre of the comic-book medium. Today, everyone knows that a superhero is someone with special powers and a flashy

costume involving image on the chest. But few stop to consider the complex and moving psychological underpinnings of this cultural

phenomenon. image Although he became a powerful symbol of “the American way,” Superman is, like Siegel and

Shuster’s image his doomed home planet of Krypton. In addition to his refugee status, some of Superman’s other distinguishing

characteristics also reflect image heritage. His Kryptonian name, Kal-El, is similar to the Hebrew for “voice of God,” and there has even been speculation that the famous “S” insignia on Superman’s chest is a

subtle image the yellow badges that Jews were forced to wear in Nazi Germany.

The “Man of Steel” himself is invulnerable, but the story of his creation involves a great deal of suffering: a boy’s mourning for his father, a people fleeing murderous

oppression, and the struggle of immigrant groups image “more American than the Americans.” Now and for all time, Superman symbolizes humanity’s hope that

the great power possessed by image for the benefit of all. image

1.

A. NO CHANGE
B. two, teenage Jewish-American, science-fiction
C. two teenage, Jewish-American, science-fiction,
D. two teenage Jewish-American science-fiction

2.

F. NO CHANGE
G. powers being bent
H. powers, which bent
J. powers were bent

3.

A. NO CHANGE
B. store, the
C. store. The
D. store, therefore the

4.

F. NO CHANGE
G. societys
H. society’s
J. societies

5.

A. NO CHANGE
B. from exploiting
C. was exploiting
D. to exploit

6.

F. NO CHANGE
G. Over the next few years, they revamped their creation along these lines, altering his appearance
H. Over the next few years they revamped their creation along these lines, altering his appearance,
J. Over the next few years, they revamped their creation, along these lines altering his appearance

7.

A. NO CHANGE
B. however
C. after which
D. DELETE the underlined portion.

8.

F. NO CHANGE
G. shorts, over tights, a cape and a logo
H. shorts over tights, a cape, and a logo
J. shorts over tights a cape and a logo

9. If the writer were to delete the preceding sentence, the passage would primarily lose:

A. a logical transition into the following paragraph.
B. details supporting the claim that the story of the creation of Superman is a moving one.
C. insight into why so few people stop to consider the ideas concerned.
D. an explanation of the psychological underpinnings of the creation of superheroes.

10.

F. NO CHANGE
G. parents an immigrant, the last survivor of
H. parents, an immigrant, the last survivor: of
J. parents, an immigrant—the last survivor—of

11.

A. NO CHANGE
B. his creators’
C. Superman’s creators
D. Supermans creators’

12.

F. NO CHANGE
G. reference to
H. definition of
J. symbol within

13.

A. NO CHANGE
B. becoming
C. to become
D. had become

14.

F. NO CHANGE
G. some use
H. some have used
J. some will be used

15. Question below asks about the preceding passage as a whole.

Suppose the author had intended to write an essay about the ways in which popular entertainment has been inspired by tragedy. Would this essay fulfill that goal?

A. Yes, because it explains how suffering, on both personal and grand scales, led inevitably to the popularity of superhero comics.
B. No, because the essay deals primarily with one specific character.
C. Yes, because Superman has appeared in a wide variety of media besides comic books.
D. No, because superhero comics are a niche medium that is only popular with a select audience.