ACT english practice test 62

DIRECTIONS: In the passages that follow, certain words and phrases are underlined and numbered. In the right-hand column, you will find alternatives for the underlined part. In most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is best, choose “NO CHANGE.” In some cases, you will find in the right-hand column a question about the underlined part. You are to choose the best answer to the question.

You will also find questions about a section of the passage, or about the passage as a whole. These questions do not refer to an underlined portion of the passage, but rather are identified by a number or numbers in a box.

For each question, choose the alternative you consider best and fill in the corresponding oval on your answer document. Read each passage through once before you begin to answer the questions that accompany it. For many of the questions, you must read several sentences beyond the question to determine the answer. Be sure that you have read far enough ahead each time you choose an alternative.


The End of Trivia?

Ever since the 1960s, when trivia was popularized as a pastime by the invention of collegiate Quizbowl and the premiere of the beloved quiz show Jeopardy!, bars and restaurants all over the country image patrons

with quiz image patrons form teams with friends or strangers and compete for prizes of food, beverages, or even cash. Of course, the environment is

much image than on a game show: instead of using buzzers, players sit with their teams and write down answers to the questions a bar employee asks over a microphone, then turn in their sheets to be scored at the end of the night. But now that nearly everyone carries a phone or some other portable device with Internet

image cheating has become nearly impossible to control.

image trivia questions involve information that is obscure but interesting, such as “Who is the only president to have also served as chief justice of the Supreme Court?” (the answer is William Howard Taft) or “What was the first animated film to receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture?” (the answer is Beauty and

the Beast). In a pub-quiz image the possible answers over with your friends is half the fun. When people first began carrying cell phones, players sometimes called friends during games, but even then,

you still image a friend who knew the answer,

image it wasn’t that much of a problem.

But phones with Internet access are a different story:

if cheating on those image by the pub’s staff, then every team will know the answer to every question! But stopping this is very hard indeed: someone typing into a tiny phone under the table is tough to spot in a big bar, and if a player sneaks into the

bathroom to cheat with a image him or her is impossible!

Some quiz nights have chosen to trust in the honor

system, image
image
Other venues have tried to develop 70 “cheat-proof” questions, like playing very short clips from pop songs or projecting celebrity yearbook

pictures onto a screen and asking players to image But trivia purists often balk at such

image identifying yearbook pictures or drum fills, they argue, is not true trivia. True trivia concerns bits of information … but every bit of information can be

looked up on a portable device! image

image
image
image
The biggest threat is that future generations raised on technology

image that can instantly summon up any factoid at the push of a button will have no motivation to memorize them, and hence no interest in trivia!

61.

A. NO CHANGE
B. nights that
C. nights; where
D. nights, and these

62.

F. NO CHANGE
G. less formal
H. less formality
J. fewer formalities

63.

A. NO CHANGE
B. access; trivia
C. access, and trivia
D. access. Therefore, trivia

64.

F. NO CHANGE
G. Predictably,
H. Lamentably,
J. Traditionally,

65.

A. NO CHANGE
B. setting, talking
C. sitting to talk
D. sit, and talk

66.

F. NO CHANGE
G. would have had
H. had to have
J. can had

67.

A. NO CHANGE
B. so
C. since
D. DELETE the underlined portion.

68.

F. NO CHANGE
G. doesn’t get itself regulated
H. wouldn’t be put an end to
J. is not adequately policed

69.

A. NO CHANGE
B. phone then stopping
C. phone, than stopping
D. phone than stopping

70. Given that all the choices are true, which one most effectively concludes the sentence by offering specific examples of what the sentence begins by discussing?

F. NO CHANGE
G. stationing staff at every table as observers
H. begging patrons not to use their phones and encouraging teams to turn in cheaters.
J. deliberately holding events in buildings where phones don’t get reception.

71.

A. NO CHANGE
B. identify them.
C. identify the ones.
D. identify.

72.

F. NO CHANGE
G. practices;
H. practices; therefore,
J. practices, when they are

73. The writer is considering deleting the portion of the preceding sentence that follows the ellipses (and replacing the ellipses with a period). If the writer were to make this deletion, the paragraph would primarily lose:

A. unnecessary information that constitutes a digression from the main idea of the passage.
B. an identification of a problem that the writer has just realized and mentions nowhere else.
C. an explanation of the conflict between modern technology and traditional notions about trivia.
D. an argument that trivia buffs should purchase gadgets with Internet access.

74. Given that all of the choices are true, which one makes for the most effective transition into this paragraph from the preceding one?

F. NO CHANGE
G. Sometimes patrons who aren’t even playing yell out the answers, but this is not the biggest threat to pub quizzes.
H. Cell phones are also hazardous when people talk on them while driving, but this is not the biggest threat they pose.
J. The biggest threat to pub quizzes is something I am going to tell you about right now.

75. The best placement for the underlined portion would be:

A. where it is now.
B. after the word generations.
C. after the word factoid.
D. after the word trivia (and before the exclamation point).