ACT English Practice Test 63

DIRECTIONS: In the passages that follow, certain words and phrases are underlined and numbered. In the right-hand column, you will find alternatives for the underlined part. In most cases, you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is best, choose “NO CHANGE.” In some cases, you will find in the right-hand column a question about the underlined part. You are to choose the best answer to the question.

You will also find questions about a section of the passage, or about the passage as a whole. These questions do not refer to an underlined portion of the passage, but rather are identified by a number or numbers in a box.

For each question, choose the alternative you consider best and fill in the corresponding oval on your answer document. Read each passage through once before you begin to answer the questions that accompany it. For many of the questions, you must read several sentences beyond the question to determine the answer. Be sure that you have read far enough ahead each time you choose an alternative.














1.

A. NO CHANGE
B. were deciding and moving
C. were deciding to move
D. decided to move

2.

F. NO CHANGE
G. up, because
H. up, so
J. up, but

3.

A. NO CHANGE
B. having looked
C. looking
D. DELETE the underlined portion.

4.

F. NO CHANGE
G. Nevertheless, I
H. I, however,
J. I

5.

A. NO CHANGE
B. pleaded, begging to be allowed
C. pleaded, begging to be allowed,
D. pleaded begging to be allowed

6.

F. NO CHANGE
G. blocking
H. were blocking
J. DELETE the underlined portion.

7. At this point, the author would like to give the reader a better idea of how she thought her father felt. Given that all the choices are true, which one best accomplishes this purpose?

A. NO CHANGE
B. he was stuck on the highway for hours and hours.
C. he couldn't see the rats even though I could.
D. he looked so small compared to the giant rats.

8. Given that all the choices are true, which one provides the best opening to this paragraph?

F. NO CHANGE
G. The rats seemed like more of an annoyance than a danger.
H. I didn't really understand what my mom meant by the rat race until years later.
J. During holidays and long weekends, my father loved to go fishing.

9.

A. NO CHANGE
B. the most awfully terrible part
C. the worst, most terrible thing
D. the worst part

10.

F. NO CHANGE
G. more happier then
H. happier then
J. the happiest than

11.

A. NO CHANGE
B. dinner and talked,
C. dinner, and talked
D. dinner and talked

12. For the sake of the logic and coherence of this paragraph, Sentence 5 should be placed:

F. where it is now.
G. after Sentence 1.
H. after Sentence 2.
J. after Sentence 3.

13.

A. NO CHANGE
B. California; I
C. California, I
D. California and I

14.

F. NO CHANGE
G. the unending and interminable lines
H. the endlessly, continuing forever, lines
J. the lines, going on into eternity without end

15. Question below asks about the preceding passage as a whole.

Suppose the writer's goal had been to write a short essay telling the reader why, in her opinion, her family moved to Redding. Would this essay successfully fulfill that goal?

A. Yes, because it describes her father's reasons for wanting to move, as the author understands them.
B. Yes, because it demonstrates that children sometimes have misconceptions about the reasons for a move.
C. No, because it fails to explain why the author was frightened by the prospect of the move.
D. No, because it focuses more heavily on the feelings of a party other than the author.